Author Archive

Piggly Wiggly Imitator – Fly Tying Video

Tungsten nymphs are superior in most fly fishing situations. The Piggly Wiggly Imitator is no exception. The pink anodized bead, and the pink rib work together to attract trout year round.

On a cold January afternoon Kohler and I were fishing the lower Provo and having a tough time sticking fish. We were filling through our boxes and trying fly after fly for a few hours without much success. Toward the end of our allotted time to fish Kohler pulled out a fly that neither of us had ever fished, an unnamed jig style nymph with an anodized pink tungsten bead. For the next 30 minutes the fly was rarely found outside a fishes mouth. As for the name of the fly, well for about a year it remained without a name, but eventually the name Piggly Wiggly stuck… not sure where it came from, but it stuck ;-)

Below is a quick film from that day on the Provo when the Piggly Wiggly came to be.

This is one of the quickest and easiest flies to tie. It also fishes well with a gold bead and a gold rib (essentially a gold ribbed hare’s ear). As jig hooks continue to gain popularity, especially amongst competition fly fishermen, it can be difficult to find quality jig hooks. This pattern is tied on a Fulling Mill Hook, but any jig hook in which you are confident will suffice. These hooks are tough and durable, and Kohler and I are very confident in their quality. Take just a few minutes, tie up a handful and give them a shot.

Piggly Wiggly Fly Pattern

Hook: Fulling Mill Jig Hook – Size 14-16
Thread: Uni 8/0 Camel
Bead: Slotted Tungsten – Anodized Pink
Tail: CDC Natural
Body: Natural Squirrel
Rib: Pink Sulky Ribbon (from your local craft store)

Review of the Renzetti 2000 Presentation

When I first got into tying, I was lucky enough to have a father in law with an old vise to lend me.  This was good for me as my wife didn’t want to spend the money.  She kept telling me over and over again that she didn’t believe that I would stick to tying flies…. I had to show her!!  After a few months of tying, I had proved that I would stick with it and I started looking around at vices.  I was drawn to a Regal stainless steel jaws vice, as it looked like a vice of high quality, and the price looked great as well!  I was intrigued by the rotary vices, but I was hesitant because of the prices.  I ended up with the regal vice, and I loved it.  In the meantime, Gilbert ended up finding a Renzetti rotary vice.  I always joked around that I didnt need or want the rotary, but I was jealous!

I finally convinced my wife that I “had to have” the rotary vice.  I sold my regal and wound up buying the Renzetti Presentation 2000.  It is a great vice, and I keep wondering to myself why I didnt make this decision years ago!  I have been able to tie flies faster, and I will only get better at utilizing the rotary feature.

There is one thing that I had to do to get this particular vice working for me.  It comes standard with a ratcheting feature.  I did not like this at all.  It makes it so you can only rotate your flies one way.  It was already driving me crazy after one fly!  Luckily, this can be reversed.  There is a small black nut located on the very end on the outside of the big silver knob (see #1 on picture).  After loosening this screw, simply tighten the big silver screw that it screwed into, and then tighten the little black screw back up and the ratcheting feature will be disabled.  This will then allow you rotate your vice in either direction.

Another nice feature with this vice is the ability to change the angle of the jaws.  This will allow you to quickly change the angle as you switch between different sized hooks and maintain a level hook while using the rotary feature (see #2 on picture below).

The Jaws hold hooks without slipping.  I have tied some flies on hooks ranging from sizes 6-22, with only a quick adjustment of the screw on the end of the jaws before using the cam to lock the hook into place and I have not had any problems.

ren. presentation 2000
ren. presentation 2000

 

Overall, I love this new vice.  It is easy to tell after using it that it is a high quality vice.  If you have’t tied with a rotary vice, I highly recommend it.  It has helped me tie flies faster, with a higher quality.  Being able to rotate the fly around as you tie allows you to see the fly at all angles to ensure a good tie.  You will not be disappointed if you upgrade to this vice!

I look forward to tying many heavy, tungsten beads euro nymphs that are sure to catch many a fish!!!

Derek Kohler – (aka fish catcher)

 

 

Vibrant Steelhead – Fly Fishing Adventure – Fly Fishing Video

Every spring I head north in search of steelhead. For the past five years I have looked forward to this adventure for months prior to the actual dates that we fish. I spend countless hours at the tying bench preparing for what I always hope will be a fruitful spring of catching powerful steelhead. It is angling for the patiently focused fisherman who knows very well that his dreams may not be realized. With that said, when the water stays running clear, and the fish are moving through the system, the chase is on… and it’s worth all the anticipation.

I have now shared my four favorite steelhead nymph patterns with fly tying instructions and a fly tying video for each of them. I do 90% of my steelhead nymphing with these four flies. Check out the links below:

Rubberleg Steelhead StoneHot Spot Rubberleg Stonefly

IMG_1051Scudmarine

Black Jack Steel - ChartreuseBlack Jack Steel
IMG_1054Tungsten Embryo

I’ve been lucky enough to have many friends, brothers, one uncle, and my dad join me on such steelheading trips. At the end of the day, it is the friends you fish with that make a trip of this sort memorable. Thanks fellas, here’s hoping for many more trips with such great company!Steelheading Friends Group Steelheading Pic

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