Beginning Fly Tyers

Green Rock Worm – Caddis Larva – Fly Tying Video

This has got to be one of the top 5 easiest fly patterns of all time. It is super quick, durable, and catches it’s fair share of fish. A true “Guide Fly”.


Caddis larva are available to trout year round. The Green Rock Worm caddis imitation has very few steps, and is a very easy fly pattern to tie. It can be used as a searching nymph, or to match the available food types in a given stream. It is bright and catches the attention of fish, so it can be used effectively as a lead fly in a tandem nymph rig to attract the fish that often will then take the small trailing realistic pattern. However, don’t let that fool you. This pattern represents free-living caddis and takes picky trout on very tough rivers. Here in Utah, Provo River fly fishing guides often tie up and fish this pattern because it is so easy and so effective.

Caddis Larvae

The Lower Provo can be a very tough fishery. As the summer rolls along the fish become more and more educated and the pickier they seem to become. Often times guides switch to drab natural nymphs, and that regularly gets the job done. However, despite being bright and flashy, quite often I have found this green rock worm fly pattern to be the fly of choice. As trout catch onto fishermen and their fly patterns, I have found that my success rate goes up when fishing the smaller sizes 18-20. Go figure!

Provo River Caddis Larva

Caddis Larva Fly Pattern

Take a few minutes and check out this fly tying video. This is a go-to caddis larva fly pattern that belongs in your box. Let us know of your success and FISH ON!

Hook: Dai-Riki 135 (Scud Hook) 14-20
Bead: Gold to match hook size: 14: 7/64″, 16: 3/32″, 18 and 20 5/64″
Thread: Uni 8/0 Olive
Rib: 4X monofilament
Body: Caddis Green Ice Dubbing
Collar: Black Hare’s Ear Dubbing

Rainbow Sow Bug Fly Tying Video

Build a Better Sow Bug

In this video there are tips on tying a quick, durable sow bug fly pattern that imitates one of trout’s favorite foods. Learn how to tie a sow bug that will get down quickly, and stick fish after fish.

The craziest thing about sow bugs is if you can find one, you’ll find a million! There are a few rivers that I fish that are chucked full of these little pill bug look alikes. Trout always seem to grow big and fat when their diet consists of sow bugs.

Sow Bug - Fly Fishing Entomology

A few years ago on a very memorable spring morning I found myself with two of my good fishing friends Brad and Phil. We were fishing one of our favorite River here in Utah which is know for its thick sow bug population as well as a healthy population of brown trout with some nice Bonneville cutthroat scattered throughout. We hadn’t been fishing long when we came upon a beautiful pocket that was bound to hold fish. Phil began by pulling out a nice brown, but with a good portion of the hole left to fish he stood aside and let me take a cast. Now that’s a good friend! Moments later I pulled out a snakey 19″ brown that despite being skinny put up a good fight. The hole was producing well! Phil then hopped back in  and pulled out another decent brown, and once again was kind enough to stand aside and let me take another stab at it. The very next cast I found myself hooked up on the nicest river cutthroat I have ever caught. A beautiful 22″ cuttie with shoulders came zipping out of the hole and tried to head down stream. Moments later, and just like the 19″ brown I had caught only a few cast before, I saw that it was my size 14 Rainbow Sow Bug that was tucked tight in the corner pocket of the fish’s jaw.

Sow Bug Caught Brown Trout
Utah Fly Fishing Cutthroat Trout

I highly recommend you give this fly pattern a shot. I’m overly confident in it’s ability to catch fish, and as a bonus its a quick tie that won’t fall apart on you. Tie some up!

Hook: Any scud hook (Tiemco 2488, Daiichi 1150, Dai-Riki 135)
Thread: 70 Denier Fl. Pink UTC
Rib: Small gold wire
Blood Line: Black Flashabou
Dubbing: Rainbow Sow-Scud
Preferred Sizes: 14-18

Piggly Wiggly Imitator – Fly Tying Video

Tungsten nymphs are superior in most fly fishing situations. The Piggly Wiggly Imitator is no exception. The pink anodized bead, and the pink rib work together to attract trout year round.

On a cold January afternoon Kohler and I were fishing the lower Provo and having a tough time sticking fish. We were filling through our boxes and trying fly after fly for a few hours without much success. Toward the end of our allotted time to fish Kohler pulled out a fly that neither of us had ever fished, an unnamed jig style nymph with an anodized pink tungsten bead. For the next 30 minutes the fly was rarely found outside a fishes mouth. As for the name of the fly, well for about a year it remained without a name, but eventually the name Piggly Wiggly stuck… not sure where it came from, but it stuck 😉

Below is a quick film from that day on the Provo when the Piggly Wiggly came to be.

This is one of the quickest and easiest flies to tie. It also fishes well with a gold bead and a gold rib (essentially a gold ribbed hare’s ear). As jig hooks continue to gain popularity, especially amongst competition fly fishermen, it can be difficult to find quality jig hooks. This pattern is tied on a Fulling Mill Hook, but any jig hook in which you are confident will suffice. These hooks are tough and durable, and Kohler and I are very confident in their quality. Take just a few minutes, tie up a handful and give them a shot.

Piggly Wiggly Fly Pattern

Hook: Fulling Mill Jig Hook – Size 14-16
Thread: Uni 8/0 Camel
Bead: Slotted Tungsten – Anodized Pink
Tail: CDC Natural
Body: Natural Squirrel
Rib: Pink Sulky Ribbon (from your local craft store)

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