Dry Flies

Foam Body Caddis – Dry Fly Tying Video

Mother’s day is just around the corner, and sure enough the rivers here in Utah are swarming with caddis. One great thing about caddis is their awesome abundance from now until late fall. Over the course of a year they make up a large portion of a trout’s diet. Caddis are very active bugs that can be identified by the splashy aggressive rise of a trout. A caddis hatch is one of my favorite times to throw a dry fly because of the aggressive nature exhibited by trout at this time. These little critters are not easy meals for trout, and after a few escape early on in the hatch it seems that the trout turn up their energy level and really get going after them. Not many casual sips during a caddis hatch!

Foam Body Caddis Dry Fly - Provo River Brown Trout

The tan foam and ginger hackle combination is my go to color variation. It has fished very well for me to both match the hatch, and as a searching pattern in the summer months.Foam Body Caddis Fly Pattern

The chartreuse foam body caddis is a great attractor or “searching pattern”. The profile of this fly with a little added color can also fish well during a hatch if the fish are not too highly pressured.

Foam Body Caddis Dry Fly

One great thing about caddis is their awesome abundance from now (late spring) until late fall. The foam body caddis is hands down my favorite caddis dry fly, followed closely by the classic Elk Hair Caddis. Give this pattern a shot in a variety of colors, and I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Recipe:

Tan Foam Body Caddis
Hook: Any dry fly hook size 14-18
Thread: Uni 8/0 Camel
Underbody: Tan Antron Dubbing
Foam: Tan 1mm X 1mm
Wing: Elk Hair
Legs: Ginger/Brown Hackle

Chartreuse Foam Body Caddis
Hook: Any dry fly hook size 14-18
Thread: Uni 8/0 Olive
Underbody: Dark Olive Antron Dubbing
Foam: Chartreuse 1mm X 1mm
Wing: Elk Hair
Legs: Black/Dark Grizzly

 

Hi-Vis Griffith’s Gnat

Early every spring I start to get dry fly fever. The thought of small midge adults coming to the water’s surface to get pummeled by hungry trout get me excited every year at this time. The Hi-Vis Griffith’s Gnat represents a cluster of adult midges, but all in all it is just a buggy looking fly. With grizzly hackle and a peacock herl body, it is hard not to look buggy and delicious! This variation  is identical to the traditional Griffith’s Gnat with the exception of the parachute that makes it more visible, especially in faster water. It is quite buoyant and floats well enough to suspend small nymphs such as midge pupa imitations or unweighted beatis patterns. It is not only effective during the early parts of the year when it is still freezing outside, but if truly works well year round on many streams and lakes.

Recipe:
Hook: Any standard dry fly hook (e.g. Daiichi 1100 or Tiemco 100)
Thread: Black 8/0
Body: Peacock herl
Hackle: Grizzly
Parachute: Para post, poly yarn, Z-lon, or any other highly visible material in any bright color you prefer

Sizes: Anywhere from 14 to 22, but my favorites are 14-18

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